Get Help With Your Italian Immigration: Citizenship and Visa

Get Help With Your Italian Immigration: Citizenship and Visa

 ITALIAN CITIZENSHIP

We assist clients with Italian citizenship acquisition, and can offer assistance with housing, language courses, and completion of the required citizenship application.

Italian citizenship is currently regulated by Law no. 91/1992 (and associated regulations for its implementation, specifically DPR no. 572 of 12 October 1993 and DPR no. 362 of 18 April 1994), which in contrast to previous laws reassesses the importance of individual intentions with regard to the acquisition of Italian citizenship and recognizes the right to hold more than one citizenship simultaneously.

We will provide you with all the necessary information you require, and we will help you determine whether or not you are entitled to hold Italian citizenship.

We can assist you with document procurement, translation, and legal certification of all the necessary documents.

Bureasy has extensive experience in the fields of VISAs, immigration, and citizenship. Our Immigration Consulting Department helps clients throughout the world visit Italy, and helps clients from Italy visit other countries.

 VISA FOR ITALY

 Short-Term Visa (or Schengen Visa)

A short-term visa allows travel for a maximum of 90 days per semester.

Therefore, the validity of the visa (i.e., the period within which it is possible to travel) is generally six months, although it is not uncommon for an embassy or consulate to issue a Schengen visa with a shorter validity in cases where the applicant has planned a very short trip.

However, in special cases (e.g., well-known people, relatives of EU citizens, or businessmen) an embassy or consulate may issue a Schengen visa valid from one to five years, with a maximum length of stay of 90 days per semester.

Both the validity and the duration of travel are indicated on the visa once it is released.

The short-term visa, also named Schengen visa, outlined by the same rules for all the states that ratified the Schengen Agreement, allows free circulation of the visa holder in the Schengen area during the period of stay.

With very few exceptions, the short-term visa does not entitle the visa holder to a subsequent issuance of a permit to stay. Therefore, the holder of a short-term visa is not allowed to settle in Italy, but can only travel in the Schengen area for the period indicated on the visa.

Citizens of some countries are exempt from a short-term visa application and therefore are allowed to travel to Italy (and other Schengen States) for a maximum of 90 days per semester without having to obtain a visa.

An applicant may apply for one of the following short-term visas:

  • TOURISM
  • BUSINESS
  • MEDICAL CARE
  • SPORTS COMPETITION
  • SELF-EMPLOYMENT
  • SALARIED-EMPLOYMENT
  • MISSION
  • RELIGIOUS REASONS
  • RESEARCH
  • STUDY
  • TRANSIT
  • TRASPORT
  • WORKING HOLIDAY

 

 Long-Term Visa (or National Visa)

A long-term visa allows the applicant to remain in Italy for a maximum of 365 days.

Both the validity and the duration of stay are indicated on the visa once it is released.

The holder of a long-term visa needs to apply for and obtain a permit to stay within eight days upon arriving in Italy.

Generally, the first permit to stay has the same duration of the national visa. Many types of a permit to stay allow the renewal or conversion for the following years with the possibility to legally settle in Italy.

An applicant may apply for one of the following long-term visas:

  • ADOPTION
  • MEDICAL CARE
  • SELF-EMPLOYMENT
  • SALARIED-EMPLOYMENT
  • MISSION
  • RELIGIOUS REASONS
  • FAMILY REASONS
  • RE-ENTRY
  • RESEARCH
  • STUDY
  • WORKING HOLIDAY
  • ELECTIVE RESIDENCE

 

 Permit to Stay

Foreign nationals who are non-EU citizens may enter Italy providing both a valid passport and, if required, an entry visa issued in their country of origin.

As soon as foreign nationals enter Italy, they should apply for a residence permit based on the same motivations specified on their entry visa.

A residence permit is not required for business, tourism, short visits, or study if the stay does not exceed three months.

EU nationals do not need a residence permit to stay in Italy.

When it comes to Italian visas, it is necessary to discern between a short-term visa “C” (also commonly known as “Schengen visa”) and a long-term visa “D” (also commonly known as “national visa”).